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Dakota Pipeline Controversy Ended

Ciara Luciano

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There has recently been controversy whether the Dakota Access Pipeline, that was supposed to cross under Lake Oahe in North Dakota, should be build.There was controversy because it would pass near the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe reservation which could affect the water supply of the people.

In recent months, many have protested against the pipeline, including Native Americans. The protest started out small but eventually grew, involving hundreds of tribes and even celebrities and activists.

In November the decision to build was postponed because officials felt more light was needed to be brought upon the subject. On December 4, the Army announced that it will not approve the easement that allows the Dakota Access Pipeline to be built.

“Although we have had continuing discussion and exchanges of new information with the Standing Rock Sioux and Dakota Access, it’s clear that there’s more work to do.The best way to complete that work responsibly and expeditiously is to explore alternate routes for the pipeline crossing,” the Army’s assistant secretary explained.

According to the Washington Post, President-elect Donald Trump vowed to support pipelines. The chief executive Kelcy Warren of the pipeline company Energy Transfer Partners, has been a major contributor to the Republican Party as well as Trump’s campaign.

Once the news of the pipeline, many who were protesting for several months celebrated in a march along the main dirt road at the Oceti Sakowin encampment set up by protesters. A large crowd gathered around a sacred fire while tribal elders sang prayer songs and beat drums.

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Dakota Pipeline Controversy Ended